Farm My Yard

December Newsletter

Farm My Yard

December Newsletter with info about How to use Nextdoor.com to spread the word!  Learn about the Pollinator Parkway Movement December 2016 Greetings! I hope your Fall/Winter is going well. here’s our current newsletter. I wanted to write you a quick note about one way I think we can get Farm My Yard going with more people. That’s Nextdoor.com. If you’re already a member of Nextdoor, you probably know what a potent tool for neighborhood organizing it is. If not, here’s a short article I wrote about it awhile back.  If you’re looking for someone to Farm your Yard – try posting on Nextdoor. If you’re looking to farm someone else’s yard – try posting on Nextdoor. Also, if you just want to encourage others in your neck of the woods to get busy ripping out their lawns and making the world more habitable for us and other species – post something…

Farm My Yard

iFarm: a great farm land resource for Oregonians wishing to farm

iFarm! This is a great way to find land in Oregon available to farm! It’s called the iFarm program! Enjoy! How iFarm Works To contact any of the landowners or farmers on iFarm, you must first complete a questionnaire describing your opportunity (for landholders) or your goals, experience, and plans (for landseekers). Once completed and approved, this information is entered into our online database (online and pdf questionnaires are below) and you may then contact any of our iFarm participants. To search our database, click on the link above, then select the type of iFarm participant you are looking for and click either “View Listings” or “Advanced Search Options.” “View Listings” displays every listing in the category that you’ve checked and “Advanced Search Options ” allows you to narrow your search by region. Listings are displayed in order from oldest first to newest at the end. To contact a participant,…

Farm My Yard

Dacha Gardens

Dacha Gardens, by Sara Pool Russia has an amazing model for urban agriculture, obtaining over 50% agricultural products from family garden plots. The backyard gardening model uses around 3% arable land, and accounts for roughly 92% of all Russian potatoes, 87% of all fruit 77% vegetables, and 59% all Russian meat according to the Russian Federal State Statistic Service. The term Dacha comes from the term “landed estate,” and generally refers to an urban garden. Dacha gardens have been around since the Bolshevik Revolution, and have been feeding Russians for over 1,000 years. Since these urban plots are too small for farm machinery, all these gardens are hand tilled, often using crop rotation and solely organic methods, and are ‘intensive’ out of necessity. This model is not just meant for feeding one family, but is an important part of the local market economy both rurally and in urban areas. 31%…